Buying Your First Home: How Much Do I Need?

Buying your first home is a huge part of the American Dream and according to statistics, 65 percent of people own their own home.

 Of those over 65, a remarkable 78% own their own homes, the vast majority of which are free and clear.

In addition, there are many tax advantages for owning a home, which makes homeownership a no brainer for most if they want to build wealth.

But How Much do Buyers Need to Acquire a Home?

The amount depends greatly on the buyer’s creditworthiness as well as which government programs they qualify for to obtain a home, and what lenders may require.

Despite popular internet gurus touting how you can buy a home with no money down unless you qualify for a VA government loan, the cheapest loans you can obtain interest wise with limited down payments are FHA loans. It is possible to obtain an or US Agricultural Rural Home for around 3.5 percent.

But Shalom Lamm wants people to keep in mind that we are talking here just for the down payment. For most people who do not qualify for such loans, they will need a roughly 20 percent down payment.

So if a typical home costs $250,000 as most homes do. then the expected down payment would be roughly $50,000.

As that amount is really tough for most people to crack. According to a popular internet mortgage lender, the actual down payment is approximately 6 percent for all home loans, which based upon this number, most potential homeowners would need around

$15,000,

However, most people who have less than the 20 percent typical down payment will wind up paying PMI, private mortgage insurance.

PMI protects the lender if you stop paying your loan.

PMI is typically 1 percent of the loan value, so if the house you buy is $250,000 and you put down a downpayment of $15,000, the PMI would typically be $2,325 per year or around close to around $200 per month on PMI alone.

Not every conventional loan provider will require PMI says arvato.  But, if they do not, you can bet your bottom loan dollar the interest rate on the loan will be higher.

Typically as well, to qualify for a conventional home loan your credit scores must be in the neighborhood of 620 or above.

Besides needing to meet the down payment requirements, you should have typically another 1 percent or $2500 per year set aside for home repairs, and around $3200 per year in property taxes.

Is It Doable with Less?

Yes, according to Shalom Lamm, a multi-millionaire real estate investor who always recommends having supreme confidence in yourself. But if you have less cash then it is always advisable to start with a smaller targeted home.

Consider looking for a home in a $135,000 to $150,000 range and branch upwards as your assets grow. There are plenty of those homes out there on the market. You just need to be on the lookout for them.